ROSTER OF THE SURVIVORS OF THE 86TH ILLINOIS VOLUNTEER INFANTRY WITH THE POST OFFICE ADDRESSES AS FAR AS KNOWN TOGETHER WITH THE PROCEEDINGS OF THE REUNION HELD AT PEORIA, ILL. AUGUST 27, 1887.

J. W.  FRANKS & SONS, PRINTERS, BINDERS AND PUBLISHERS, PEORIA, ILLINOIS.

 

 

Transcribed by Gaile Thomas

 

PREFACE.

             Some time previous to the last anniversary of the 86th Illinois Infantry a very few of the survivors met and consulted in regard to the necessity of making a call for a reunion. The question was decided in the affirmative, and accordingly a circular making the call was issued and a programme prepared and sent to every comrade as far as known. The result was a happy reunion on the 27th day of August, 1887, and a happy greeting to everyone present. An organization was affected and the proceedings are submitted in this little book.

 In presenting this little work to the survivors of the 86th Regiment it is hoped it will be highly prized by every comrade and preserved as a souvenir, and be a reminder of the good time coming on the 27th day of August, 1888, which it is hoped, in point of number, will exceed 1887. It is desired that a copy be placed in the hand of every comrade, now living, who was in any way connected with the 86th Illinois Infantry and has an honorable discharge from the same.

We are not able to give the death roll in full, but hope to obtain by the next reunion the names of all who have died since the war, and give date when and where they died. It is asked of every survivor that he assist in procuring the name and residence of all living, also the name and place where all have died since mustered out of service.

John McGinnis, Secretary.

CALL FOR REUNION.

 

PEORIA, Ill., June 27, 1887.

To the Comrades of the 86th Reg. Ill. Vol. Inft.:

At the request of a number of the old comrades of the 86th regiment, an informal meeting was held at the National Hotel in this city, on June 25th, to consider the propriety of holding a reunion on Aug. 27, 1887, it being the 25th anniversary of the mustering in of the regiment in 1862.

At said meeting, those whose names are appended to this call, were either present or responded by letter, requesting that such a reunion be held.

The following resolutions were offered and unanimously passed:

Resolved: That it is the sense of this meeting that a reunion of the 86th Regiment Illinois Volunteers be held on Aug. 26 and 27, 1887, at Peoria, Ill., said reunion being for the purpose of a permanent organization, and for perpetuating the memories of the dead, and to keep afresh in the hearts of the living the cause for which they served their country during three years of the most bloody war ever known.

Resolved: That a copy of these resolutions be signed by those present and forwarded to each member of the regiment, and every member of the regiment is requested to report at Peoria, not later than 9 a. m. Aug. 26, 1887, preparatory to holding a business meeting to commence at 11 a. m. Aug. 26th, at which time a permanent organization will be effected and business transacted, so that the 27th will be free to all members to have a good time. The 27th coming on Saturday, and many members wishing to return home, it was thought best to arrange as above.

At said meeting it was moved and seconded that Col. A. L. Fahnestock, of Glasford, Ill., be elected President, and Rev. N. S. Haynes, of Peoria, Ill., be elected Secretary, said positions to be held until a permanent organization be effected, and permanent officers elected. All correspondence concerning the reunions should be addressed to the President or Secretary.

As the addresses of a great many members of the regiment are unknown to the committee, we will thank any member receiving this notice and knowing the addresses of comrades who have moved away, to kindly send same to the President or Secretary, so that an invitation to the reunion may be sent them.

It is earnestly hoped that every member will be present, but where it is impossible for the members to be present, it is earnestly desired that such members will write a letter to the President or Secretary, so that we may know how many there are living, and where they reside.

COL. A. L. FAHNESTOCK,

MAJOR J. F. THOMAS,

A— CAPT.  Jo. MAJOR,

PRIVATE  N. S. HAYNES,

D—CAPT. FRANK HITCHCOCK,

F—CAPT. J. L. BURKHALTER,

G—CAPT. S. L. ZINSER,

1st LIEUT. MARTIN KINGMAN,

SERGEANTS, {L. S. NORTH,

                        {H. M. CLOUD,

H—CAPT. JOHN H. HALL,

K—LIEUT. JOHN McGINNIS.

PROGRAMME

for the 25th Anniversary Reunion of the 86th Regiment Illinois Volunteer Infantry, Peoria  August 26th and 27th, 1887, as sent out by committee.

FRIDAY, AUGUST 26TH, 1887.

2 P. M. — Business Meeting at the G. A. R. Hall. Called to order by President Col. A. L. Fahnestock.

Prayer by the Secretary, Rev. N. S. Haynes.

Permanent Organization and other Business.

In the evening there will be a Social Gathering, where all old Comrades can meet each other. Particulars to be announced in the afternoon.

SATURDAY, AUGUST 27TH.

10 A. M. — Assembling of Regiment at Rouse's Hall. Called to order by the President.

Prayer by the Rev. N. S. Haynes.

Music by the old Regimental Band.

11 A. M. — Address by Major J. F. Thomas.

Music by Regimental Band.

12:30 P. M. — Dinner in Dining Hall adjoining.

Recitation by Miss Jones, daughter of Comrade J. J. Jones, of Eureka.

Toasts:

1. The 86th's Marches and Battles. By Col. A. L. Fahnestock.

2. CAPTURED AND RECAPTURED. By Capt. J. L. Burkhalter.

3. Comrades WHO CARRIED THE MUSKET. By Lieut. John McGinnis.

4. THE LUDICROUS SIDE. By McKendre McNeal.

5. OUR FLAG. By Sergt. M. H. Cloud.

6. OUR LAST BATTLE. By Capt. S. L. Zinser.

7. OUR FALLEN COMRADES. By Rev. N. S. Haynes.

Responses limited to five minutes.

Dinner,  50 cents. Souvenir Anniversary Badges, printed in Gold, 25 cents; with Gold Fringe, 50 cents. These can be supplied to any Member, on application, if unable to be present.

A Collection will be taken to help defray expenses.

PROCEEDINGS.

 

Pursuant to call of the Committee, the members of the 86th Regiment Illinois Volunteer Infantry met at the G. A. R. Hall, in Peoria, Ill., at 11 A. M., August 26, 1887, Colonel A. L. Fahnestock presiding.

On motion of Lieut. Kingman, E. C. Silliman was elected Secretary pro tem.  Secretary  Haines  being  absent.

The President appointed the following committee to collect the names of members present and report at 2 o'clock p. m.:

CAPT. JO. MAJOR, J. H. BRUBAKER Co. A.
NO MEMBER PRESENT Co. B.
E. C. SILLIMAN, H. H. NURS Co. C.
CAPT. FRANK HITCHCOCK, S. D. LOVE Co. D.
HENRY HOSSELTON Co. E.
CAPT. J. L. BURKHALTER, LIEUT. JOHN HALL Co. F.
LIEUT. KINGMAN, L. S. NORTH Co. G.

CAPT. JOHN H. HALL, A. W. BELCHER

Co. H.
COL. A. L. FAHNESTOCK Co. I.
LIEUT. JOHN MORROW, LIEUT. JOHN McGINNIS Co. K.

 

             Adjourned until  2  P. M.

………………………………………….

                           2 o'clock, P. M.

             A Committee on Permanent Organization was appointed by the President, consisting of Capt. Jo. Major, Capt. J. L. Burkhalter, Lieut. Archibald Brocken, Capt. John H. Hall, H. H. Nurs, Lieut. John Morrow, George Hall, Lieut. Martin Kingman, Capt. Frank Hitchcock, James Schreffler.

             Committee reported a Constitution and By-Laws, which were adopted as follows:

 

NAME AND DURATION.

 

This Association shall be known as "The Association of the Eighty-Sixth Regiment Illinois Infantry Volunteers," and shall continue so long as two members remain to meet together.

 

OBJECTS.

             The objects of the Association shall be to hold Annual Reunions during the existence of the Association ; to keep alive a feeling of fraternity among its members ; to obtain and keep a complete roster of the members of the regiment,— dead and living,— together with the date and place of the death of the dead, and the residence and business of the living. And upon the death of any member the same shall be reported to the Secretary of the Association, with full particulars, by the member or members residing nearest said deceased member, to be entered in full on the records of the Association.

ELIGIBILITY.

             Every honorably discharged member of the 86th Regiment Illinois Infantry shall be a member of this Association.

             For the purpose of maintaining the necessary expense of the Association, each member is expected to pay into the treasury the sum of one dollar annually. Provided, that if any member shall, by reason of any misfortune, feel  unable to pay the same, his failure to do so shall in no manner affect his membership in this Association.

ELECTION — OFFICERS AND DUTIES.

             The officers of this Association shall be elected annually, and shall consist of a President, a Vice-President, a Secretary, a Treasurer, and an Executive Committee of ten members, consisting of one member from each company ; such officers shall discharge the duties that usually appertain to such offices.

             Committee recommended the election of the following officers for the ensuing year :

             President — MAJOR J. F. THOMAS.

             Vice-President — CAPT.  J. L.  BURKHALTER.

             Secretary — LIEUT. JOHN McGINNIS.

             Treasurer — CAPT. JOHN H. HALL.

             Executive Committee — CAPT. Jo. MAJOR, LIEUT. PETER WYKOFF, H. H. NURS, CAPT. FRANK HITCHCOCK, C. W. McKOWN, LIEUT. MARTIN KINGMAN, CAPT. JOHN H. HALL, COL. A. L. FAHNESTOCK.

             At the request of Secretary McGinnis, E. C. Silliman was elected Assistant Secretary.

             A vote of thanks was passed to Bryner Post G. A. R. for the use of their hall.

             Letters were read from a number of absent comrades.

             L. D. Love moved "That the next Reunion be held at Peoria, on August 27, 1888."

             Capt. Hall tendered the regiment a trip on the Fort Clark Street Railway, at 8 o'clock a. m, Saturday. Invitation accepted.

             Moved to adjourn to Rouse's Hall, at 7:30 p. m., for a social session.

             The social session in the evening at Rouse's Hall took the form of an experience meeting. Lieutenant Martin Kingman related the history of the battle-fields of the regiment. John Sabin recited "Lookout Mountain." The regimental band played martial airs, the original drummer, Samuel Silzell, of Glasford, who entered the service when only 14 years old, and remained on duty all through the war, being one of the number. John McGinnis, John Sabin and A. W. Belcher sang "Marching through Georgia." Remarks were made by Capt. Hall, Lieut. Zinzer and Dr. Robinson.

SECOND DAY.

 

The first thing on the programme Saturday morning was a ride over the Fort Clark Horse Railway, by invitation of the President and Superintendent, Capt. John H. Hall. The trip was taken over the entire line, starting about 8 o'clock, and the passengers filled five cars, and enjoyed the view of the city and the cool morning breezes.

Music by old Regimental Martial Band.  Led by Samuel Silzell and James Schreffler.

The comrades then met at Rouse's Hall. After music by the regimental band prayer was offered by the Rev. N. S. Haynes.

Col. A. L. Fahnestock presented the regiment with the photographs of as many of the officers as he had been able to collect. He said he had sent all the records, including his private diary, to the Secretary of War.

Capt. Major thanked the colonel for his present, and on his motion the photographs were returned to him to be forwarded to Springfield, and to be preserved in Memorial Hall.

Letters were read from Col. Laughley, of Champaign, S. B. Haller, of Sparland.  J. C. Tobias, of Sargeant, Neb., and other absent comrades.

Col. Fahnestock and Comrades Brubaker and Moody were appointed a committee to prepare a full roster of the regiment, and send it to Gen. J. C. Black, Commissioner of Pensions, in compliance with his request.

Miss Annie Janvier Jones, daughter of Lieut. J. J. Jones, of Co. A, recited  " Mission Ridge " in a highly impassioned and effective manner. The selection was a magnificent word picture of "The Battle of Mission Ridge." At the close of the exercises she was adopted  " Daughter of the Regiment  " by a unanimous rising vote.

Major Thomas then delivered the following address:

Mr. President, Comrades of the 86th Illinois Infantry: For me to say that I am glad, exceedingly glad, to meet you in this reunion, is to give but feeble expression to my feelings. The fact is, emotions of gratitude and thankfulness well up in my heart to the author of our existence, that, notwithstanding the many hardships endured, and the many dangers that we have passed through during the last quarter of a century, and the additional fact that many of us have not met for a score of years, I say I am gratified beyond measure that so many of the old 86th are permitted to meet to-day, to look each other in the face once more, and to grasp the hand again that was true and loyal in the days when our country stood in need of loyal men. And I am glad that we meet in this beautiful city, so near the spot where we entered formally upon our line of duty as soldiers of our common country.

Then I am proud of the fact that representatives of the rank and file of our regiment  have  chosen me to address you. While I am proud of this honor, I can truthfully say that I am sorry they did not select some other comrade to talk to you to-day.  For I am well aware of the fact that there are a score or more of the members of the old regiment who are better qualified to entertain and interest you than I am.

It is just twenty-five years ago to-day, and not far from this hour, since Capt. R. E. Ewing, of the regular army, mustered us into the United States service. We were then in camp on the old fair grounds, known to us then, and now as "Camp Lyon." Our regiment numbered 923 men, rank and file.

And, fellow-citizens, while I am here to address my comrades, it is not my intention to enter upon any lengthy eulogiums upon the 86th regiment. But I believe facts will justify me in saying that our regiment compared favorably with the other regiments sent to the front by our grand Prairie State, in defense of the General Government. And if facts will sustain me in this statement, then I might sit down contented, and leave the standing of Illinois soldiers, including our own regiment, to the future historian, for

I say, and that without fear of successful contradiction, that where all the loyal States did nobly, and are entitled to lasting honor for their defense of the Union, Illinois was not behind any, but was in the very fore-front from first to last, not only with the number of men furnished but with their intelligence, their reliability and their unflinching bravery.            

In the brief period of time allotted me to-day, it will be impossible for me to more than touch upon a few of the leading incidents connected with our term of service.

On the 7th day of September, 1862, the regiment boarded the cars bound for the Land of Dixie. It was a bright, lovely Sabbath morning. As we marched down through the city the sidewalks, windows and balconies were crowded with the friends of the regiment. It was a beautiful and yet a sad sight, for, among the lookers-on, were our loved ones, and while they waved us a silent adieu, the tears would come unbidden; for soldiers and friends realized that, to many, this parting meant a long, a last farewell. But, thank God, as I know my comrades do to-day, that in the dark days of 1863 and 1864, when the loyalty of many faltered, these same hands that waved us adieu in this fair city, remained loyal to the country and true to the interest and welfare of its defenders.

No soldier, who went out from the camp in this city, can ever forget what the loyal men and noble, true-hearted women of this place did for us while we were in the army. And you will permit me, right here, to pay a small tribute of gratitude to that noble band of women in Peoria, at whose head stood that motherly, queenly woman, Mrs. Brotherson. God bless her memory, I do not know of any way by which Peoria County soldiers could do themselves greater honor than by having a properly-inscribed tablet placed upon her tomb. She certainly deserves this much at our hands, for all she possibly could do for us and the flag, she did willingly and cheerfully. Who, among the gifted of our land could do more? If the brave, true-hearted women of Peoria, of our State and of the country do not enjoy happiness here, and if there is not a state of eternal felicity awaiting them in the future, it is not and will not be for the want of the prayers of the soldiers of the land. And right now, when so many of these same loyal, loving friends, together with the entire population of the city, and all the surrounding country, are bowed down with grief because of the fearful loss of life caused by the recent terrible railroad accident, I want to extend to them, one and all, the heartfelt sympathy and condolence of this band of mature-thinking veteran soldiers, and to assure them, were it possible, we would lift the load of grief from their stricken hearts. But that is beyond the power of man; we can only offer them words of loving sympathy and commend to the only true source of comfort.

And now to take up the thread of address in reference to our regiment. It will be remembered that, together with the 85th Illinois, we arrived at Jeffersonville, Indiana, September 9th, and went into camp on the north bank of the Ohio river, opposite the City of Louisville, Ky., our camp being known as Camp Joe. Holt. It was while in this camp that we commenced our soldier's life in the way of camping in tents, and here began that everlasting drill, which is so fatiguing and yet so essential to the efficiency of an army. On the 14th of September we crossed the Ohio river, and on the 15th we were brigaded with the 85th and 125th Illinois and the 52d Ohio. Colonel Dan. McCook, of the 52d, being placed in command of the new brigade. I have enjoyed many hearty laughs when thinking over our experience the first night we were placed on picket, and of the barrel of sweet potatoes that Lieut. Beebe and I bought the following morning, and got nicely roasting, when the order came for the reconnaissance on the Bardstown Road. I am provoked yet that we had to leave before those potatoes were roasted.

Then when I think of the review in the streets of Louisville under the rays of a burning sun, and of the large number of men who had their health ruined, and of the brave men who lost their lives from sunstroke, all to gratify the pride and folly of a military ninny, who thought more of display than he did of the lives of his men, I feel sad, and sometimes, when thinking upon the needless, senseless folly and cruelty, I become fighting mad. October 1st, 1862, commenced the Kentucky campaign, which proved to be a foot-race after the rebel general Braxton Bragg. On the 8th of October occurred the first battle that our regiment was ever engaged in, that of Perryville, where the behavior of the regiment and brigade gave promise of their future usefulness. The campaign terminated by our arrival at Nashville, Tennessee, November 7th. This was, perhaps, the most trying campaign for our men that they ever passed through. We were raw recruits, tolerably ignorant of the duties of a soldier; knew but little about taking care of ourselves. Our mode of cooking was but little removed from that of the rude barbarian. You know it was every fellow for himself.  Men boiled their coffee in a tin cup, and roasted, or rather burned, the outside of his meat by thrusting a stick through it and holding it in a blaze, and frequently it was eaten half raw. Besides, during this campaign there was a great scarcity of water. The men became so thirsty that they would drink from ponds of water covered with a green scum and in near proximity to dead animals, and sometimes they would actually drive the hogs from their wallow to obtain a little dirty water to wash down the dust that they were compelled to inhale. Then you remember the enormous loads that you carried. When we think of all these things, the wonder is not at the large number who gave out, but, rather, that so many stood up under these great disadvantages.

After arriving at Nashville, Tenn., we were camped with our division, Gen. Sheridan's, some miles south of the city, until December 9th, when we relieved Gen. Turchin's brigade at Nashville, and from that date until August 20th, 1863, we were on duty as garrison troops in and around the city. The winter of 1862 and '63 was very trying on our men. We had no shelter for the troops but the Sibley tent, and of all the contrivances ever invented to kill off brave men these miserable tents are, perhaps, among the most efficient. It is useless to spend time in describing them, you all know what they are. While here the duty performed was very severe, we had to unload boats, load cars, guard trains, dig trenches, and hold constantly a long picket line. The result of this labor and exposure told fearfully upon the health of the troops, so much so that our regiment lost more men by death and discharge for disability than during all the remaining term of our service. August 11th, 1863, we lost by death our colonel, David D. Irons. The colonel was a brave, generous man, and although not a military man, he was loved and respected by his regiment. August 20th we left Nashville, stopping a few days at West Harpeth and Columbia, Tenn.; then marched all the way from Columbia to Bridgeport, Alabama, alone. Everyone will remember the sharp skirmish fire at Linnville. I remember it very distinctly, for I was officer of the day. Col. Magee sent for me while I was at supper, and when I reported at his head-quarters he enquired quite sharply, with that peculiar twitch of his mustache, " Captain Thomas, what is the meaning of this devilish firing on your skirmish line, sir?" Upon repairing to the scene of action I found that a lot of daring rebel hogs had charged my skirmish line, but they were handsomely repulsed, leaving a number of killed and wounded in our hands, where they were humanely cared for. I always thought that some of the good boys of the regiment sent the colonel a quarter of one of those same pigs, at all events he was extremely pleased the following morning. We arrived at Rossville Gap, in Missionary Ridge, on the night of the 16th of September, 1863, and on the 18th, late in the evening, our brigade was sent to the front to burn a bridge and came near being captured. Our brigade were the first troops in the battle of Chickamauga and the last to leave the field after the battle was over.

You remember our experience at North Chickamauga, how the men and officers, too, suffered with hunger after Bragg got possession of Lookout Mountain and cut our cracker line. I got so hungry that I actually stole twenty or thirty ears of Col. Magee's corn one night, and that when he had a soldier standing guard over it with a fixed bayonet.

On the night of November 23d we received marching orders, and early in the morning of the 24th our division marched down the river to the mouth of the South Chickamauga and crossed the river on the Pontoon Bridge. Then came the battles of Lookout Mountain and Missionary Ridge. Close upon the heels of these great battles the forced march to relieve Gen. Burnside, at Knoxville, Tennessee. This was a very severe campaign, made in the winter season with the men poorly clad. Upon our return it was  estimated that there were five hundred men in our division without shoes. The morning of December 8th, after leaving Madisonville, you could track the division by the blood from the men's bare, bleeding feet. It turned warm and rained all the afternoon. Late at night we went into camp at Coonosoga Mills, where we lived on the fat of the land until the morning of the 15th, when we resumed the march, arriving at our old camp at the mouth of the North Chickamauga during the night of December 18th, having been gone a month, less six days, with only three day's rations, and without a change of clothing, however, we were fat, dirty, ragged, and I think we had our full share of grey-backs. Notwithstanding these hardships, there occasionally occurred a laughable incident that went far in the direction of relieving the men from the depressing effects of the toilsome march. With your permission I will relate one where my greatly esteemed friend, Lieut. Kingman, was the victim of the joke. You soldiers know that it is much easier to march on the right of a column of troops than on the left, and to make it alike equal upon all, the companies were changed every morning while campaigning. Thus Co. G became the color company on our way to Knoxville. Lieut. Kingman was in command of the second plattoon and had charge of the colors. In climbing one of those East Tennessee mountains he discovered a house in the advance and a bevy of young ladies by the side of the road. You know that the lieutenant was young and quite a gallant, of course these young ladies must be honored, so he ordered the colors unfurled. The state colors was a beautiful banner with the spread Golden Eagle on it in all his glory, the lieutenant felt justly proud of this banner. Now imagine, if you can, his disgust and chagrin, when, instead of cheering the flag, one of the young ladies ran to the door clapping her hands in great glee and exclaiming " Mother, mother, come here quick and see the beautiful buzzard on this flag."

If the young lady had paid sufficient attention to the ornithology of her country to know the difference between the American eagle and the miserable buzzard, she played it very fine and deserved praise for her superb acting. However, it was a good while before Kingman heard the last of that buzzard.

We remained in our camp at the North Chickamauga until December 26th, when we crossed the river and went into winter quarters at McAfee Church, on the Chickamauga battle field. Made a reconnaissance of Buzzard's Roost in February, and March 6th our brigade was moved to Lee & Gordon's Mills, where we remained until May 3rd, at which time General  Sherman commenced concentrating his forces at Ringgold, preparatory to the coming campaign. While at McAfee Col. Magee resigned because of ill health, and Major Fahnestock was promoted to the vacancy. Our regiment regretted very much the necessity which compelled the resignation of Col. Magee, as he had proved to be able and efficient regimental commander.

May 7th commenced the campaign against Atlanta, the Gate City of the South, our command participating in the important battles, and doing its full share of fighting in that bloody campaign. June 27th our brigade was selected as one of the three brigades that constituted the assaulting party upon the enemies works at Kennesaw Mountain, where over a fourth of our men were killed and wounded. This was the sad day of our experience as a brigade, all the regiments suffering severely. Here we lost our first brigade commander, Col. Daniel McCook. Col. Dan., as we were wont to call him, was young, impetuous, and sometimes boyish. Yet all in all he was a good officer, brave and loyal, not only to his country, but to his own immediate command. Our next ranking officer, Col. Harmon, of the 125th Illinois, was instantly killed. And it was here that we lost the gallant young Captain Van Antwerp, of Company E, besides many of our men, but time will not permit me to enumerate the long list of killed and wounded who fell in that fatal assault. Suffice it to say, that they were among our best men, tried and true as any men who ever fell defending the flag of their country. After the fall of Atlanta, together with all the army, save the 20th corps, we were run back to Chattanooga and our division was ordered as far south as Florence, Alabama, where I had the misfortune to receive a wound that sent me home, thus missing the wonderful march to the sea.

Joining the army again at Savannah, Ga., we had the honor of participating in the campaign through the Carolinas, flanking Charleston and forcing its evacuation. This was a wonderful campaign, made in the winter below the frost line, in the rain and mud of that treacherous land of quicksands. None of us will ever forget our experience at the Catawba River, where it took fifty men and six mules to pull each of our wagons up the hill. Notwithstanding the hardships of this campaign the health of the men was remarkably good. The men who were with us that winter were veterans, men who had been tried in the "crucible of exposure and hardships and whose endurance never failed. Then came the last battles of our army — Averysboro and Bentonville — where we lost the gallant Captains Bogardus and French, with some of our brave boys. Captains Bogardus and French were men of experience and ability, they would have adorned almost any station in life. After these battles came the short respite at Goldsboro, and then on to Raleigh;  the armistice and surrender of our long tried and able adversary, General Joe. E. Johnson, a man, who in the opinion of many military men, was the equal, if not the superior, of Robert E. Lee or any one of the Confederate commanders. To-day he is holding an important office under the Government, by appointment of the President of the United States May we not cherish the hope that he and others who attempted the destruction of this government may have a higher regard for the sanctity of their oaths than they did at the beginning of the war. Of the foot-race to Richmond, the march to Washington, the grand review, the muster out, homeward bound and final pay, it is useless that I speak; and yet in the transition of these immense armies from their position of veteran soldiers to that of civilians, is displayed the grandeur and the superiority of our institutions and people over that of any other government or people in the world. Our men laid down their arms quietly, and once more assumed their respective places on the farm, in the shop, office, school and pulpit. Generals who had commanded divisions, corps and armies laid aside their swords, pulled off every vestige of military authority and rank, and became private citizens of our common country. Did the world ever witness so sublime a sight as the disbanding of two millions of men and their return to civil life without the slightest ripple of discord? A country that can mold from her private citizens such an army as ours was, and maintain for four years such a war as was our late civil war, and at its close return her soldiers to civil life quietly and peacefully as did ours, is the wonder and admiration of the world. Such a country and people can ever be trusted in the future.

Fellow Citizens : These men, my comrades, that I am addressing to day are no part of a rebel army of mercenaries who fought and risked their lives for glory, nor were they striving for gain or plunder. They were then, and are to-day, a part of the best blood of the land; men whose patriotism is not to be measured by the amassing of colossal fortunes ground out of the toil and blood of their fellows ; but they are a part of that great army of men who left the walks of civil life to save this nation when its very foundation pillows were tottering and likely to fall and crush out the last nope of the countless millions of toiling, liberty-seeking and liberty-loving human beings. They are the representatives of the men who came forth at the beginning of the war with the patriotic determination to save this country or perish beneath its ruins. And after sufferings endured upon the march, in hospital, in prison pens and upon battle-fields, where lines of battle melted away like snowflakes beneath the rays of a midsummer sun, they returned to their homes with one country, one flag and liberty for all. And to-day, after all these years, they still carry the grand old banner of the union; and the stars on the blue field of that glorious old flag is lighting up with ever-increasing effulgence the pathway of intelligence, liberty and justice between man and man of every race and color.

And now, my comrades, permit me to congratulate you upon the proud distinction that you enjoy of having fought for your country in time of its greatest need. You were participants in the fiercest, and yet the grandest, struggle for human liberty and the rights of the oppressed and downtrodden of our race since the creation of man.

You fought not for conquest, nor to establish some disputed boundary line, but you did fight, and that bravely too, yes heroically, to uphold the authority of the general government, and to make the grand principles enunciated in the declaration of independence a verity, and you have the proud satisfaction of knowing that you aided materially in making this absolutely a free country. So that to-day, twenty-two years after the close of that terrible death struggle between right and wrong, everywhere, from the frozen steppes of Alaska to semi-tropical Florida, and from the east, where the turbulent Atlantic dashes its angry waves against the rock-ribbed coast of New England, to the far west, where the waters of the mild Pacific lave the shores of the Golden Gate, all over the land, wherever American enterprise has opened up the country, and American genius has introduced our civilization beneath the starry banner of the Union, every man, woman and child is free. And not only to-day, but for all coming time there shall never more be heard in this God given heritage, the clanking of the manacles of the enslaved, except for the punishment of crime. You fought to settle a vexed question that brought on the war, and in this you were eminently successful. Your service rendered your country has taught the lesson to mankind, throughout the civilized world, that this country is abundantly able to take care of itself, and to settle its own internal affairs in its own way. Another lesson taught by the war, and one that the world will be slow to forget, is the very important fact, that this is a government, and not a confederacy. Yes, this is a government, a Union of many in one, and I venture the assertion, that in the future it will be remembered that the one cannot withdraw from the Union without the consent of the many.

I think the late civil war has demonstrated another fact, and that is the very important fact that our popular form of government is the strongest government in the world when supported by an intelligent people.

I know we have a great many grumblers and fault finders, men, and women too, who profess to believe that the country is fast going to ruin, and the world is growing worse and worse every day, and the people less law-abiding. Comrades and friends, let me say to you in all earnestness, that there is no truth in such an assertion, and no foundation for such an opinion. If the people who find so much fault, would only spend a small portion of their time in thanking God for what they enjoy under this magnificent government, they would be much more contented and happy, besides they would materially aid in making the world better. It is contrary to all experience, and to sound reason, that the world can be anything else than better.

This is an age of intelligence, of the broad dissemination of knowledge, an age of wonderful discoveries and inventions. I can remember well when a fearful crime might have been committed, or a terrible accident have occurred in a neighboring state or in one of the counties of our own state, and we have remained ignorant of the fact for weeks and, perhaps, months. How is it to-day. You know that while enjoying our breakfast we can look over the morning paper and read the events of yesterday, not only in our own little community, but all over the civilized world, and by means of the telephone talk face to face with friends a hundred miles distant or by the telegraph we can send questions to the old world and receive answers in a few minutes. Yes, owing to the difference in time, we can send a message to a friend in California, and he receive and read it two hours before we wrote it here in the telegraph office. By this rapid transit of news, we read of accidents and crimes the world over, and without stopping to reason, many people rush to the conclusion that everything is wrong, and that the world and especially their own country is fast going to the devil. When, in all probability, the wrong is with themselves, and their conclusion are arrived at by a process of false reasoning, or rather by an entire absence of reason. If the thousands of free presses, our immense volume of reading matter, and our magnificent system of free schools with their great array of intelligent and industrious teachers, together with our numerous churches and their great army of christian workers. If all these combined has the tendency to make the world worse, the sooner we destroy the press of the land, make a bonfire of our libraries and current literature, pull down our school houses, colleges, churches and public charities, and return to a state of ignorance and barbarism the better. You cannot fail to see, my comrades and friends, that such a position is absurd in the extreme, and makes the man who assumes it appear ridiculous in the eyes of an intelligent community. No, no, my friends, the world is not growing worse, but better. It is better to-day than it was at this date last year— better then than it was at the close of the war. I am inclined to believe that our country is pretty safe. We want this class of people who are constantly predicting the ruin of the country to wait until those grey-haired veterans are all gone. I know that we are growing somewhat old, but we know something of war, and will fight if we are put to the test, and there are more than half a million of us left. Woe betide the people who attempt the destruction of this government while we live. And when we leave this stage of action there will be two millions of our sons remaining, and they in turn will leave four millions of our grandsons? Won’t these sons and grandsons of veteran fathers defend with their lives what we, their fathers, saved and bequeathed to them as a sacred trust. Most assuredly they will, if the necessity ever comes. If there is nothing in the world to trouble these sore-heads and fault-finders, except forebodings of evil concerning our country and government, let me say to them that the worry will not pay, it is a poor investment, they would do better to rest their fretful souls in peace and die happy.

And now, my comrades, in conclusion, let me remind you of the fact that we are growing old and are being rapidly mustered out. Look at the array of our great leaders who have passed away in the last two or three years. That consummate commander, Ulysses S. Grant, the greatest soldier of the age, if not of the century (Jeff. Davis to the contrary, notwithstanding) ; he whose wonderful ability to plan and execute upon the military chess-board was beyond the capacity of any soldier of the age, he has gone to his final reward; and the gallant Geo. B. McClellan, who, perhaps, had no superior as an organizer, has been called away; and the chivalric Hancock, who, as a corps commander, had no superior and few equals, he, too has gone to his rest ; besides scores of other prominent leaders and thousands of comrades who carried the musket, the brave men on whom these great commanders relied for victory ; the men to whose sufferings and devotion to principle we are indebted for all we have and are as a people.

And last, though not least, the great volunteer general, the soldier's friend in camp, on the weary march, and in the hell of battle, as well as in the halls of congress,— our own loved John A. Logan. He, too, has gone to his final reward, and all that remains of that " towering personality " is a clod of silent clay over which a nation weeps. But, thank God, he has left engraved upon our statute books and upon the pages of our history, in letters of living light, the impress of his great intellect ; and when his work here seemed but half finished " he stepped quietly from the senate chamber to that low, green tent whose curtain never swings !"

"Rest, soldier, rest, for peace is thine;

Rest, warrior, for earth's strife is o'er;

Rest, statesman, fame's bright laurels twine thy noble deeds;

The golden shore for thee is won, while tears are shed,

For lion-hearted Logan's dead!"

And now, my comrades of the 86th Illinois Infantry, let me call your attention once more to the fact that twenty-five years ago to-day we numbered 923 men, and the great majority of these men were between the ages of 18 and 30 years, a few of us were a little older. Of that number of strong, hearty young men how many are there living to-day? Fully one-half have gone. They are sleeping, some in the cemeteries near their homes, where loving hands yearly decorate their graves ; but many of them are sleeping far from home and loved ones, and, no doubt, some are resting in nameless graves. But it matters little where their mortal remains are, we will ever cherish their memories and yearly we will decorate a mound to their memories.

We are passing rapidly away, comrades. Who of our number will stand up in this city and talk to his comrades of the old 86th twenty-five years from to-day, and how many of the comrades will be present to listen to his trembling accents? There may be a few of the younger members of the regiment remaining, but they will be few. While we do remain let us quit ourselves like men. Never do any act or engage in any business that will lower our dignity as citizen soldiers of the grandest and freest government in the world; and let us ever cherish a fraternal feeling for each other. When we fall one by one let us close up the ranks, taking once more the touch of the elbow. Let us pursue our onward march waiting for the reveille and final taps that is to relieve us from duty and usher us into our eternal rest.

The comrades, with a number of their ladies, then marched to the court house square, where their photographs were taken in a group.

After partaking of a bountiful dinner in the banquet hall at Rouse's, the assemblage returned to the main auditorium, where toasts were proposed and responded to. Major Thomas officiating as  master of ceremonies.

Colonel Fahnestock spoke of the "Marches and Battles of the Eighty-sixth Regiment" as follows:

Comrades, Ladies and Gentlemen : It is with pride and pleasure that I Call to memory a few incidents of the part taken by the officers and enlisted men of this grand old regiment, organized and mustered into the service of the United States, by Captain R. C. Ewing, August 27, 1862, at Camp Lyon, Peoria, Ill. The maximum strength of the regiment mustered in was 3 field, 5 staff and 30 line officers ; there were 889 enlisted men, making a grand total of 987 men. September 7, 1862, with drums beating, flags waving and cheers from our friends and citizens of Peoria for our success, we marched and boarded the cars for Louisville, Ky. We left Louisville October 1, overtaking Gen. Bragg's army near Perryville, Ky., October 8, this being our first battle. The regiment did nobly and made a gallant charge, driving the enemy from our front. We fought this battle under the command of the gallant Phil. Sheridan and Col. Daniel McCook. We marched after Bragg's retreating army to Crab Orchard, then returned and marched to Bowling Green, Ky., thence to Nashville, Tenn., arriving at that place November 7. We remained at Nashville, doing all kinds of duty, until August 11, 1863, when the regiment met with the loss of our dear old Col. David W. Irons. Lieut.-Col. D. W. Magee now took command of the regiment. He had experience in the Mexican war, and, being a good disciplinarian, under his instruction the regiment soon became proficient in drill and the manual of arms. We left Nashville for Brentwood, and thence to Columbia, Tenn. We marched from there to Huntsville, thence on to Chattanooga, Tenn., arriving there in time to take an active part in the battle of Chickamauga, September 19, 20 and 21, 1863. Remaining near Chattanooga until October 29, we moved with our brigade to Brown's Ferry, on the Tennessee river, and assisted Gen. Hooker to cross and form a junction with our army, relieving our starving men and animals. November 24 we assisted in floating Gen. Sherman's pontoons down the Tennessee  river, crossing and fighting the battle of Missionary Ridge, and after the battle pursuing Bragg's retreating army to Ringoid, then marched to the relief of Gen. Burnside, at Knoxville, Tenn. The regiment returned to Chattanooga, then moved to camp to Lee & Gordon's mill and guarded the valley of the Chickamauga until spring. May 3, 1864, we marched for Atlanta, Ga., fighting the battles of Buzzard Roost, near Dalton, Ga., Mill Creek, Resaca, Rome, Dallas, Kennesaw Mountain, charging their works, losing 26 killed, 60 wounded and 12 missing — a total of 98, Chattachochee River, Peach Tree Creek, Atlanta. At Jonesboro we charged the enemy's works, and assisted in capturing one battery, 1,600 prisoners and Gen. Govan. September 3 we marched and guarded the prisoners to Atlanta, then with the brigade moved by rail to Athens and Florence, driving General Forrest across the river, again returning to Atlanta the second time. November 16, 1864, we left Atlanta with Gen. Sherman for the sea; fought our way to Savannah, Georgia, through North and South Carolina. We fought the battles of Averysboro and Bentonville, gaining a glorious victory; then marched to Goldsboro, forming a junction with Gen. Schofield's army. We marched from Goldsboro April 10, 1865, and passed through Raleigh, the capital of North Carolina, here receiving the good news of the surrender of Lee's army. We then marched to Richmond, Va., on to Washington City, passing in grand review, mustering out of service, June 6, 1865, 29 commissioned officers and 359 enlisted men — total, 388. To-day, of the 19 commissioned officers that were mustered into service August 27, 1862, only 11 remain to celebrate this twenty-fifth anniversary. Of the 889 enlisted men mustered into service, 166 were killed and died of disease, 160 were wounded in battle and 33 captured by the enemy. We fought sixteen battles, numerous small engagements, marching on foot and by rail 5,500 miles. Comrades, let us not forget our dead that gave their lives to defend our country and flag. Their graves attest their courage, and, sad to think, many are buried amongst the unknown.

Captain J. H. Burkhalter, of Galesburg, responded to the toast, " Captured and Recaptured," which was of a rather personal application. Mr. Burkhalter acknowledged the corn, and admitted that he was "straggling" when he was taken.

Lieut. John McGinnis, of Peoria, responded to the toast, " Comrades Who Carried the Musket."

Mr. President, Comrades, and Fellow Citizens : With due respect for the officers whose duty it was to command, but the honor of the victory belongs to the comrades that carried the musket.

We have met here to-day to renew our comradeship and to talk of men and times gone by, but let us remember the dead with the living, for they are in our memory still. Some fell dead at our side, many died of wounds and sickness in camp and in hospital, others suffered untold horrors in the prison pen, and died of treatment that was a disgrace to the civilization of the age. And to whatever branch of service each may have belonged, let us have proper regard, living or dead. Let us, as it were, linger a moment at the tomb of Gen. Grant. Here is where a nation pays homage. He it was who had the inspiring genius to direct, and never surrendered a man to an enemy. And while we thus linger., let us think of Gen. George H. Thomas, the " Rock of the Chickamauga," and champion at Nashville.

Logan, we cannot forget him, he was the hero at Atlanta, and the Soldier Statesman. These three in spirit Triune, where are they. Gone to  their reward. Let us unite our hearts in saying blessed are the dead who die in the Lord, yea saith the Spirit, for they rest from their labors, and their works do follow them. But to the comrades who carried the musket are we greatest indebted, for they gained our victories, they conquered our peace. And now, we do not wish to glory over a surrendered enemy or exult over a fallen foe. But we do rejoice that the principles for which we fought and for which our comrades died, is the verdict sustained by Eternal Justice and send greeting to all mankind, Our general's confidence was strengthened or weakened by the number of bayonets represented in line, but  the victory came of the valor of the comrades who carried the musket, and when from Appomattox and Durham's Station the shout of triumph came and the sound was heard from the swamp, the valley, and mountain it was inspiring to our hearts. 'Twas not from the " throat of Treason." Neither was it wafted on the breeze by the" tongue of Slander," for loyalty market its echoes and reverberated its sound. It was the voice of our civilization.

To describe all is more than I am able to do, but to realize with you I can, for I was there, I saw the comrades on the march, I enjoyed their sports in camp, I watched with them on picket and on guard, I witnessed the charge and saw them in the battle front. They were distinguished heroes, for they it was who carried the musket. Orators may speak and declare the virtues of our generals, poets sing their requiem, but the blessings of a grateful and loyal people is due, and belongs to the comrades who carried the musket.

On account of the absence of the respondents, Mr. McKendre McNeal, of Henry, and Mr. H. Cloud, of El Paso, the one being detained at home by illness, and the other having missed the train, the toasts, "The Ludicrous Side" and "Our Flag," were dispensed with.

Capt. S. L. Zinser responded to the toast, "Our Last Battle,"

OUR LAST BATTLE.

 

March 19th, 1865, our last battle was fought near Bentonville, North Carolina. Several days before that, March 16th, we had a battle with Gen. Hardee, at Averysboro. Gen. Sherman then directed the whole army towards Goldsboro, the right wing. 15th and 17th army corps, Gen. Howard commander, marching on the Fayetteville road towards Goldsboro, and the left wing, 14th and 20th corps, Gen. Slocum commander, marching on the Averysboro road, towards the same point.

We can readily call to mind that two or three days after the battle of Averysboro, they were among the most wearisome of the campaign. The roads, never good in that country, were now almost impassable, on account of incessant rains. The marching was slow and very tiresome. On the day of the battle the rains had ceased. Although years have passed, our last battle is still fresh in our memory. I remember the day well. It was Sunday, a beautiful and sunshiny day, and had it not been for the terrible rattle of musketry, and the fierce roar of cannon, we would have been delighted with the warbles of the beautiful birds of the sunny south. Many of us recall when we started on the march that morning, the whole army was in the best of spirits. Every soldier seemed to feel that we were rapidly approaching the end of the war, and on the way to our longed-for homes.

We all felt we would soon reach Goldsboro. At that point we expected to join the armies under Generals Schofleld and Terry, who were coming from Newbern to open up a line of communication with our friends at home. We expected our mail there, new shoes and clothing, and a good long-needed rest, and then as an invincible army, of the very best men of the nation, to take a fresh start "on to Richmond."

Every comrade will bear me out, and every true-friend of the soldiers of the late war for the Union, will echo it, in saying that no better soldiers could be found in the whole nation, than the soldiers belonging to the military division of the Mississippi, Gen. Sherman commander. The troops of this army had almost marched across a continent. They had been immured to all kinds of hardship; tried by fire, water, shot and shell.

On the morning of the 19th, the 14th corps started on the march. The 20th corps, nearly a day's march in the rear, the right wing was from eight to twelve miles southward from us. We little dreamed that before nightfall many a brave boy would be dead on the field of strife, and many more bleeding and dying in a field hospital. The same skillful and shrewd foe who disputed our march from Chattanooga to Atlanta was again confronting us. More than 22,000 confederates, under Gen. Johnson, were concentrated in our front, across the very road and to the right and left of it; our corps of about 12,000 troops were marching by the flank. The confederates were in their own chosen position, the country was swampy and dense with scrubby undergrowth. Before noon Gen. Carlin's division, which was in the lead, came in contact with the enemy's skirmishers. Our foragers became engaged in a lively fight, Gen. Carlin, supposing he had nothing but cavalry opposing him, pushed forward with two brigades to charge the works, but soon found he was attacking a superior force of infantry, whose fire had another sound than that of cavalry. About two o'clock the enemy made an attack on Buell's brigade, which was on the left of Carlin, both in front and flank, driving him to the rear in confusion. The confederate divisions, under Stewart, continued the assault, striking Carlin's brigades in flank and rear, knocking them back. This took time, our boys determined not to be beaten. The enemy came on step by step, our men retreating, firing volleys with terrible effect, forming a new line, and again making a stand, until Carlin's division was seemingly cut off. A battery of ours was captured.  At this crisis of the battle Gen. Jeff. C. Davis ordered our brigade to charge upon the flank of the enemy who was following Carlin. The attack on the flank did the work. We charged them on the run and drove them at the point of the bayonet. Carlin's and Buell's troops now rallied on our line and thus regained what was lost. But the battle was not over. On our right was a gap, the enemy made for it; fortunately the troops of the 20th corps arrived on the field. A brigade formed on our right, but too short to fill the gap. About five o'clock the rebels again made a general attack on our lines, and kept it up until night. Gen. Hoke's division charged upon our works, but was repulsed. They found the gap between our division and the rest of the line ; they made a desperate assault on the brigade on our right, but were beaten back with heavy loss. Some of the confederates got through the gap and tried to attack our division in the rear. A rapid change of front on our part quickly routed them and made our victory complete.

Considering the number engaged the losses were heavy. The total loss on our side was 1,604, 1,196 were in our (14th) corps. Among the wounded was our General Fearing. The confederate loss was greater, 267 dead and 1,625 prisoners fell into our hands. How many dead they carried from the field we don't know.

This was our "last battle." It was the last battle of the war. The Union was saved. To the world it was demonstrated that the United States is a nation. A month later the confederate army surrendered to Generals Grant and Sherman.

Now a word in regard to the 86th. It was in the hottest of the fight, not a man faltered. Col. Fahnestock was there, Major Thomas was there, we were all there. At one time during the fight it looked as though the day was going to result in defeat. You will remember when the rebels found the gap on our right the bullets came whizzing on our right flank. The 86th deployed to the right on the run. A brigade from the 20th corps helped us out of a tight place. I tell you, comrades, I am proud of my old regiment in "our last battle." We lost one killed and twenty-two wounded. Among the wounded was Capt. Bogardus, of Company G. He died of his wounds on his way home. Several others died in the hospital. In conclusion, I will say I am exceedingly rejoiced to have met with you, and hope we shall live to have another reunion one year from this day.

The Rev. N. S. Haynes, of Peoria, responded eloquently to the toast, "Our Fallen Heroes." In conclusion, he said:

The preservation of the integrity of the Union is worth all it has cost. Of that appalling price the Eighty-Sixth paid its part. Our comrades sickened in the field, and died in camp or hospital; were killed in battle; expired from wounds received; hungered and perished in rebel prisons; one and all smitten by the hellish hand of treason in the awful hour of the nation's midnight. How brave they were! How true! With what holy patriotism, with what divine unselfishness they suffered and died for national unity, the principles of liberty, the rights of men, the cause of God. Their lives will ever be to us an inspiration to patriotic endeavors; their deaths will chant a requiem in our hearts through all the years of time. Comrades, may we each feel and say, let my tongue cleave to the roof of my mouth, may hand fall palsied at my side, ere I dishonor, by voice or vote, the hallowed memories of our heroic dead.

At the suggestion of Charles McKown, of Gilson, a collection was taken to buy a suitable engraved badge for "the daughter of the regiment," and Miss Jones then recited "The Veteran and His Grandson."

On motion of Lieut. Martin Kingman, the minutes of the reunion were ordered printed for distribution among the members of the regiment.

With this action the reunion was concluded.

 

COMRADES IN ATTENDANCE.

The following is a complete roster of the comrades in attendance.

Company A

Name

Post Office Address

 

 

Capt. Joe. Major

Eureka

J. A. Brubaker

Benson

John Tomb

Eureka

R. T. Payne

Eureka

Daniel Perine

Eureka

Thomas Foley

Lostant

Peter Brubaker

Cruger

John Watson

Cruger

Rev. N. S. Haynes

Peoria

J. B. Robinson

Secor

John B. Varbel

Secor

H. C. Baker

Redwood Falls, Minn.

Lieut. J. J. Jones

Eureka

H. B. Darst

Eureka

Jaspar J. Brown

Peoria

William Dixon

Forrest

Amos Q. Wilson

Secor

 

Company B

Name

Post Office Address

 

 

Archibald Bracken

Wichita, Kan.

A. J. Diehl

Normal

Louis Lehman

Mattoon

John W. Smith

Henry

Robert Clark

Henry

Jos. Heber

Henry

 

Company C

Name

Post Office Address

 

 

Maj. Joseph F. Thomas

Chillicothe

E. C. Silliman

Chenoa

Geo. B. Morrill

Northboro, Iowa

Sanford H. Stillman

Nortonville, Kan.

Adam Crawford

Seward, Neb.

Geo. Colwell

Kewanee

H. H. Nurs

Hallock

F. L. Sexton

Long Point

Jas. B. Ferguson

Princeville

Wm. J. Baldwin

Peoria

A. P. Weber

Saratoga

Ansel Crouch

West Hallock

Albanus Jenks

Dana

John D. Jump

Weston

Hiram S. Daman

Adair, Mo.

Cyrus S. Root

Sparland

Alfred Proctor

Rome

Charles E. Weidman

West Hallock

Oscar D. Stowell

Hallock

John C. Laudstrom

Rome

Cyrus Reed

Chillicothe

Lieut. R. B. Beeke

Chillicothe

 

Company D

Name

Post Office Address

 

 

Capt. Frank Hitchcock

Peoria

Joel Kimsey

Peoria

James T. Morris

Panola

William Greenhalgh

Rosefield

Richard McCarthy

Trivoli

Joseph Wrigley

Trivoli

William Wyckoff

Trivoli

John Kleffman

Trivoli

S.D. Love

Tamora, Neb

William Graham

Elmwood

David H. Anderson

Henry

Wm. Treeby

Larchwood, Iowa

 

Company E

Name

Post Office Address

 

 

Henry F. Hosselton

Peoria

George Hall

Lawn Ridge

James Hall

Humiston, Iowa

G. T. Thompson

Sparland

Addison Tanquary

Sparland

B. N. Frisby

Sparland

Andrew Kimball

Chillicothe

Ambrose Gehrt

Lawn Ridge

James Carter

Lawn Ridge

 

Company F

Name

Post Office Address

 

 

Capt. James F. Burkhalter

Galesburg

Lieut. John Hall

Maquon

Albert Smith

Maquon

C. W. McKown

Gilson

J. G. Jones

Tecumseh, Neb.

Manuel Mowrey

 

Adjt. L. J. Dowdy

Maquon

 

Company G

Name

Post Office Address

 

 

Milton H. Cloud

Paxton

Benjamin F. Whistler

Mackinaw

G. W. Botham

Washington

David Bracken

Bloomington

Lieut. Martin Kingman

 Peoria

L. S. North

Washington

John Lamason

Mackinaw

H. C. Layton

Mackinaw

Wm. H. Waughap

Drakeville, Iowa

Jacob Westerfield

Stanford

H. B. Smith

Morton

Dr. J. W. Robinson

Sheldon

A. Graham

Washington

H. F. Heiple

Washington

Campbell Lee

Gridley

Capt. Sol. L. Zinser

Maquon

G. W. Ferner

Washington

Jonah Ruble

Washington

James Trowbridge

Washington

Roger Shoemaker

Washington

John T. Gibson

Pontiac

John Ruble

Gridley

T. B. Lane

Deer Creek

 

Company H

Name

Post Office Address

 

 

Capt. John H. Hall

Peoria

W. C. Steward

Peoria

J. N. Place

Peoria

William Blondel

Peoria

James A. McFarland

Peoria

A. W. Belcher

Peoria

M. H. Buck

Monica

George M. Moore

Elm Grove

Lieut. E. E. Peters

Peoria

William Buck

Peoria

 

Company I

Name

Post Office Address

 

 

Col. A. L. Fahnestock

Glasford

James Shreffler

Glasford

J. C. McQuown

Glasford

Bernard Fries

Glasford

Benjamin Erford

Glasford

Andrew Green

Glasford

A. C. Tindall

Glasford

Benjamin Hobble

Glasford

Ezekiel Petty

Glasford

John B. Petty

Glasford

Samuel Silzell

Glasford

Levis Krischer

Glasford

J. L. Fahnestock

Peoria

David Shreffler

Peoria

Frank Simpson

London Mills

John Earnest

Peoria

 

Company K

Name

Post Office Address

 

 

Lieut. John Morrow

Chenoa

John McGinnis

Peoria

John M. Sabin

Hoopston

John Z. Slane

Princeville

E. Keller

Princeville

James E. White

Princeville

Samuel Coburn

Princeville

Elijah Coburn

Princeville

William H. Wisenburg

Princeville

 

ROSTER OF SURVIVORS OF WAR.

FIELD OFFICERS.

Name

Post Office Address

 

 

Lieut.-Colonel Allen L. Fahnestock

Glasford, Ill.

Lieut.-Colonel D. W. Magee

Wyoming, Ill.

Major James S. Bean

Aurora, Ill.

Major Orlando Fountain

Sabetha, Kansas

Major Joseph F. Thomas

Chillicothe, Ill.

Adjutant James E. Prescott

 

Adjutant Lansing J. Dowdy

Maquon, Ill.

Quarter-Master Archibald Bracken

Wichita, Kan.

Surgeon M. M. Hooton

Chicago, Ill.

Chaplain Geo. W. Brown

Abington, Ill.

 

NON-COMMISSIONED STAFF.

Name

Post Office Address

 

 

Quarter-Master Sergt. Charles Magee

 

Com. Sergt. Thomas A. McMorris

California

Com. Sergt. Wm. J. Longfellow

 

Hospital Steward Jos. W. Robinson

Sheldon, Ill.

 

MUSICIANS.

Name

Post Office Address

 

 

Alonson P. Webber

Saratoga Ill.

James Shreffler

Glasford, Ill.

Samuel Silzel

Peoria, Ill.

 

---------------------------------------------

COMPANY A

Name

Rank

Post Office Address

 

 

 

Joe. Major

Captain

Eureka, Ill.

J. J. Jones

1st Lieut

Eureka, Ill.

A. W. Stewart

Sergeant

 

A. Q. Wilson

Sergeant

 

Silas E. Brooks

Sergeant

 

John R. Kinnear

Sergeant

 

John H. Brubaker

Sergeant

Benson, Ill.

Aaron C. Bullington

Corporal

Elliott, Ill.

Joseph A. Carr

Corporal

 

Robt. Holmes

Corporal

Milford, Ill.

Rufus King

Corporal

Fort Scott, Kan.

Joel T. Martin

Corporal

Red Cloud, Neb.

Frank This

Corporal

Fairbury, Ill.

John Tomb

Corporal

Eureka, Ill.

Henry C. Baker

Corporal

Redwood Falls, Minn.

 

 

 

Allison, James A.

Private

 

Adams, John W.

Private

 

Brown, Henry

Private

 

Brown, John T.

Private

 

Brown, Jasper J.

Private

Peoria, Ill.

Brubaker, Peter

Private

Cruger, Ill.

Childs, Edwin A.

Private

El Paso, Ill.

Carnahan, Hiram E.

Private

 

Chapman, James

Private

 

Cable, Simon P.

Private

 

Cramer, Levi

Private

 

Dixon, William

Private

Forrest, Ill.

Dial, Richard

Private

 

Darst, Henry R.

Private

Eureka, Ill.

Dehm, John

Private

 

Davenport, Jonas L.

Private

 

Flam, Michael

Private

 

Fletcher, Irvin

Private

 

Foly, Thomas

Private

Lostant, Ill.

Foote, Charles

Private

 

Graham, Lorenzo D.

Private

 

Hallam, William W.

Private

Valparaiso, Neb.

Haynes, N. S.

Private

Peoria, Ill.

Hein, John

Private

 

King, Jeptha B.

Private

Hoover, Mo.

Longfellow, John C.

Private

 

Long, Harden

Private

 

Lowery, Joseph E.

Private

 

Mohr, Abraham

Private

 

McPeak, Ellis E.

Private

 

Mohr, John F.

Private

 

Miller, James B.

Private

 

Manning, Miles

Private

 

Oer, Benjamin

Private

Kappa, Ill.

Payne, Roland F.

Private

Eureka, Ill.

Payne, Joseph E.

Private

 

Pepper, Joshua S.

Private

 

Perrin, David R.

Private

Eureka, Ill.

Ralston, Harmon J.

Private

 

Rodebush, Geo. W.

Private

 

Robison, John E.

Private

 

Stowell, Luther E.

Private

 

Sisson, Saml.

Private

Council Grove, Kan.

Summers, Albert H.

Private

 

Tandy, James W.

Private

 

This, John

Private

Colfax, Ill.

Watson, John H.

Private

Cruger, Ill.

Varble, John B.

Private

Secor, Ill.

 

COMPANY B

Name

Rank

Post Office Address

 

 

 

J. P. Worrell

Captain

Ft. Larned, Kan.

Johnathan C. Kingsley

Lieut.

York, Neb.

Nelson McVicker

Lieut.

 

Robert M. Buck

Sergeant

Marrietta, O.

John G. Ferris

Sergeant

Mt. Ayer, Iowa

John F. Renoad

Sergeant

 

Alfred J. Diehl

Sergeant

Normal, Ill.

Thomas F. Kingsley

Sergeant

 

William Merrill

Sergeant

 

Geo. W. Berdine

Corporal

 

Allen M. Penney

Corporal

 

Noah Pettit

Corporal

 

Jacob M. Burnham

Corporal

Gilman, Ill.

Elisha Barnaby

Corporal

 

Milton Graham

Corporal

Rome, Iowa

Thomas H. Taylor

Corporal

 

Zenas C. Worley

Corporal

 

 

 

 

Berdine, Walter J.

Private

 

Berdine, Martin V.

Private

 

Brown, Robert

Private

 

Brown, Harvey S.

Private

 

Bennett, Joseph

Private

 

Burns, Geo. M.

Private

 

Burns, John M.

Private

Sedgwick, Kan.

Cunningham, P. S.

Private

 

Clark, Robert A.

Private

Henry, Ill.

Dawson, John L.

Private

Lonetree, Ill.

Dawson, Clark M.

Private

Henry, Ill.

Dixon, Jackson

Private

 

Ervin, Charles B.

Private

Wichita, Kan.

Erwin, Robert S.

Private

Henry, Ill.

Griffin, John

Private

 

Galloway, Samuel

Private

 

Greene, Perry E.

Private

 

Hamilton, John F.

Private

 

Hamilton, Samuel J.

Private

 

Hamilton, Aaron

Private

 

Huber, William J.

Private

Oxbow, Ill.

Ham, John N.

Private

 

Holler, Wm. B.

Private

Sparland, Ill.

Lee, Charles

Private

Banner Springs, Wyandotte, Kan.

Lehman, Louis L.

Private

Mattoon, Ill.

Matthewson, Chris. H.

Private

 

McVicker, Edward

Private

Chillicothe, Ill.

Matthews, James B.

Private

 

Mutton, Robert B.

Private

Grand Island, Neb.

Mutton, William H.

Private

Henry, Ill.

Mills, Richard T.

Private

 

Morrison, Holmes

Private

Henry, Ill.

McMackin, Grofton M.

Private

 

Maxwell, James

Private

Marysville, Kan.

Norris, John

Private

 

Noll, Sol

Private

Henry, Ill.

Poole, George

Private

 

Poole, Aaron

Private

Anselmo, Neb.

Patch, Jeremiah

Private

 

Patch, Isaac

Private

 

Randall, Reuben W.

Private

 

Ray, Newton

Private

Henry, Ill.

Skinner, Adolphus

Private

 

Stanton, William

Private

 

Smith, Ben. F.

Private

 

Snyder, Edwin A.

Private

Henry, Ill.

Sneathan, Merimoth

Private

 

Saulter, John W.

Private

Harlan, Iowa

Sharp, Edward

Private

 

Smith, James F.

Private

Henry, Ill.

Smith, John W.

Private

Moline, Ill.

Swander, Daniel L.

Private

 

Thompson, William H.

Private

 

Thompson, James M.

Private

 

Wood, Edward

Private

 

Warren, Joseph

Private

 

Wright, John

Private

 

Wandling, Hamilton P.

Private

 

Whitman, Adington

Private

 

Warren, James

Private

 

 

COMPANY C

Name

Rank

Post Office Address

 

 

 

Reuben B. Beebe

Lieut.

Chillicothe, Ill.

Edwin C. Silliman

Lieut.

Chenoa, Ill.

Alfred S. Proctor

Sergeant

Rome, Ill.

John D. Jump

Sergeant

Weston, Ill.

Joseph J. Hamilton

Sergeant

Seward, Neb.

Edson Turner

Sergeant

Passadena, Cal.

James Mitchell

Sergeant

Minden, Mo.

Cyrus Root

Corporal

Sparland, Ill.

Curus Reed

Corporal

Northampton, Ill.

Webster Green

Corporal

Iola, Kansas

Isaac M. McCully

Corporal

Valley Falls, Kan.

George E. Morrill

Corporal

Northboro, Iowa

Charles M. Young

Corporal

Stanley, Neb.

Sanford H. Stiliman

Corporal

Nortonville, Kansas

 

 

 

Ashworth, William

Private

 

Bland, William

Private

Sterling, Kan.

Bland, John

Private

Sterling, Kan.

Bell, John H.

Private

Dallas Centre, Iowa

Bolton, George

Private

Kingsley, Iowa

Baggs, John

Private

Peoria, Ill.

Baldwin, William J.

Private

Peoria, Ill.

Brown, Harvey L.

Private

West Hallock, Ill.

Brown, Abel W.

Private

 

Canterbury, Samuel

Private

 

Crotz, Wm. H.

Private

Cameron, Ill.

Crawford, Adam

Private

Seward, Neb.

Colwell, Geo. W.

Private

Kewanee, Ill.

Carter, Elbert S.

Private

Montana

Crouch, Ansel

Private

West Hallock, Ill.

Clauson, Henry

Private

Chillicothe, Ill.

Dray, Henry S.

Private

 

Damon, Hiram

Private

Adair, Mo.

Ferguson, James B.

Private

Princeville, Ill.

Gibbs, Lewis

Private

Chenoa, Ill.

Glaze, Isaac

Private

Pierce, Neb.

Gallop, Ralph P.

Private

Dana, Ill.

Hutchinson, John M.

Private

Winfield, Kan.

Harrington, Jno.

Private

Los Angeles, Cal.

Jenkins, Wm. M.

Private

Iowa

Johns, Samuel A.

Private

 

Jones, James A.

Private

Marshall, Mo.

Jenkins, Albanus

Private

Dana, Ill.

King, Robert

Private

 

Londstrom, John

Private

Chillicothe, Ill.

Marsh, James

Private

Farina, Ill.

McDonald, James K.

Private

 

Mason, John

Private

 

Maxon, Matthew

Private

Saunemin, Ill.

Nurs, Henry H.

Private

Hallock, Ill.

Parsons, Abram S.

Private

Chillicothe, Ill.

Putnam, Allen

Private

Pontiac, Ill.

Rutherford, Jacob J.

Private

Chillicothe, Ill.

Reynolds, John W.

Private

Laprocina Centre, Ill.

Saxton, Frederic L.

Private

Long Point, Ill.

Stewart, John

Private

Weston, Ill.

Stillman, Anson P.

Private

Nortonville, Kan.

Sanger, Adna T.

Private

Concordia, Kan.

Selders, Thomas B.

Private

Wady Petra, Ill.

Stowell, Oscar D.

Private

Hallock, Ill.

Troxell, Wm.

Private

Audobon, Iowa

Vining, Wm. H.

Private

Wilsey, Kan.

Wallace, Alex

Private

Atlantic, Iowa

Wilson, Loren J.

Private

Lawn Ridge, Ill.

Wilson, Geo. N.

Private

Spring Bay, Ill.

Weidman, Chas. E.

Private

W. Hallock, Ill.

 

COMPANY D

Name

Rank

Post Office Address

 

 

 

Frank Hitchcock

Capt.

Peoria, Ill.

William D. Faulkner

Lieut.

Colgate, Dakota

William H. Hall

Lieut.

Geneseo, Ill.

Isaac L. Gleaves

Lieut.

Chattanonga, Tenn.

Jeremiah P. Parkhurst

Sergeant

Kansas

Samuel J. Horine

Sergeant

Lane, Ia.

John Kluffman

Sergeant

Trivoli, Ill.

William D. Lee

Sergeant

Iowa

Lemuel R. Elliott

Sergeant

 

Leonard Bickford

Sergeant

Sheldon, Mo.

Alfred M. McKinney

Sergeant

Wymore, Neb.

Ezra K. Conrad

Corporal

Blue Hill, Neb.

William Treeby

Corporal

Larchwood, Ia.

Daniel Cobb

Corporal

Sheldon, Mo.

William Graham

Corporal

Elmwood, Ill.

William S. Kennedy

Corporal

New Orleans, La.

Joel L. Kimsey

Corporal

Peoria, Ill.

Thomas McCoy

Corporal

Arkansas

William Wycoff

Corporal

Trivoli, Ill.

James F. Morris

Corporal

Panola, Ill.

Charles E. Taylor

Corporal

Grimfield, Ia.

Joseph Wrigley

Corporal

Trivoli, Ill.

Samuel D. Love

Corporal

Tamora, Neb.

 

 

 

Anderson, David H.

Private

Henry, Ill.

Arnold, Wm. B.

Private

Trivoli, Ill.

Bostwick, Wm. E.

Private

Farmington, Ill.

Conrad, Elias H.

Private

Hastings, Neb.

Champ, Victor R.

Private

Glassford, Ill.

Dewey, Isacher B.

Private

 

Frank, Jessie

Private

Trivoli, Ill.

Fry, John

Private

Peoria, Ill.

Fry, Christian

Private

 

Greenhalgh, Richard W.

Private

Rosefield, Ill.

Gregory, John F.

Private

Ill.

Hartman, Christopher

Private

Trivoli, Ill.

Holtmeyer, Joseph H.

Private

 

Johnson, Daniel W.

Private

Iowa

Kingon, Perry

Private

 

Kemple, Charles B.

Private

Iowa

Krouse, Martin

Private

Iowa

Krouse, John

Private

Iowa

Long, Thomas M.

Private

Ill.

Lobaugh, Abram

Private

 

Miller, Samuel A.

Private

 

McCarty, Richard

Private

Trivoli, Ill.

McMains, James J.

Private

Grove City, Neb.

Miller, George

Private

Iowa

Memeyer, Wm. S.

Private

Oseola, Ia.

Palmer, Rosaloo

Private

 

Preston, Martin

Private

Ponca, Neb.

Preston, David

Private

 

Rood, Merrit R.

Private

Pleasant Gap, Mo.

Richardson, Wm. M.

Private

Iowa

Stoffer, Alva

Private

 

Williamson, John

Private

Trivoli, Ill.

Wrigley, Wm. E.

Private

 

Wescott, Horotio

Private

 

Walker, Benj. F.

Private

 

Williamson, Joseph

Private

Trivoli, Ill.

 

COMPANY E

Name

Rank

Post Office Address

 

 

 

Frederick A. Waldorf

Capt.

 

Geo. A. Smith

Capt.

Colony, Kan.

Henry Wilson

Lieut.

 

Harvey Foreman

Lieut.

Omaha

Jesse D. Honeywell

Sergeant

Monroe, Wis.

William Callen

Sergeant

 

Stephen Parsons

Sergeant

Sparta, Kan.

Henry Wilcox

Sergeant

 

Charles F. Hamilton

Corporal

 

Joseph S. Stewart

Corporal

 

William H. Seruton

Corporal

Lewistown, Maine

George E. Johnson

Corporal

 

Orin Fusbee

Corporal

Sparland, Ill.

George W. Hall

Corporal

Lawn Ridge

John A. Joh

Corporal

Beloit, Kansas

Christoph Mannaham

Corporal

 

Geo. W. Ramey

Corporal

Eureka, Kan.

Wm. F. Speers

Corporal

Stark, Ill.

Adison Tanquary

Corporal

Sparland, Ill.

Herman J. Wilcox

Corporal

Bradford, Ill.

Geo. W. Snell

Corporal

Henry, Ill.

 

 

 

Anderson, Joseph

Private

Juniata, Neb.

Buchanan, Joseph

Private

 

Brown, Daniel

Private

Chillicothe, Ill.

Britton, George W.

Private

Odel, Iowa

Black, Robert H.

Private

 

Bridagroon, Julius

Private

Norton, Kan.

Culton, James H.

Private

 

Crosman, Jacob

Private

 

Carter, Joseph

Private

Lawn Ridge, Ill.

Corrington, Benton

Private

Nevada, Iowa

Dawson, William

Private

 

Davidson, Jonathan K.

Private

 

Eckley, Ephraim

Private

 

Grady, Stephen

Private

Henry, Ill.

Grife, Henry

Private

 

Goodale, Alonzo

Private

 

Grove, John

Private

 

Gert, Ambrose

Private

Lawn Ridge, Ill.

Honeywell, John G.

Private

Hanson, Neb.

Henneker, William

Private

 

Hosselton, Francis W.

Private

Graymount, Ill.

Hosselton, Henry F.

Private

Peoria, Ill.

Hammel, Wm. B.

Private

 

Hall, James C.

Private

Humiston, Iowa

Kimball, Andrew

Private

Chillicothe, Ill.

Kinney, George B.

Private

Blue Springs, Neb.

Livingston, Thomas

Private

Russell, Iowa

Mason, Christopher P.

Private

 

McCreedy, Orin P.

Private

Rockford, Iowa

Norman, Alfred J.

Private

Logan, Iowa

Organ, William

Private

 

Parsons, John

Private

Chillicothe, Ill.

Powers, Willard

Private

 

Pettit, William H.

Private

 

Philhower, Nicholas

Private

 

Reeder, Thomas

Private

Oneida, Kan.

Reagan, James W.

Private

Pawnee, Neb.

Reagan, Tilman S.

Private

Stella, Neb.

Schleigh, Jacob

Private

Bennett, Kan.

Sumner, Thomas

Private

 

Stewart, James W.

Private

 

Sides, Samuel F.

Private

 

Shurts, David

Private

Henry, Ill.

Shurts, Abram

Private

Henry, Ill.

Schanck, Andrew

Private

 

Schuyler, Peter

Private

 

Shackelford, Merritt J.

Private

York, Neb.

Terry, John M.

Private

 

Thompson, Geo. T.

Private

Sparland, Ill.

Woodward, Louis

Private

Little Sianc, Iowa

Wilson, Eli

Private

Panora, Iowa

Waldron, Jr., John

Private

 

 

COMPANY F

Name

Rank

Post Office Address

 

 

 

J. L. Burkhalter

Capt.

Galesburg, Ill.

John Hall

1st  Lieut

Maquon, Ill.

Amos P. Loveland

2nd Lieut

Neal, Kan.

Timothy D. West

Sergeant

 

Nelson D. Combs

Sergeant

Tecumseh, Neb.

James T. Dudley

Sergeant

San Francisco, Cal.

Benjamin F. Scott

Sergeant

Ottumwa, Iowa

William M. Gardner

Sergeant

Gilson, Ill.

James McNaughton

Sergeant

Maquon, Ill.

John W. Mire

Sergeant

Red Cloud, Neb.

Samuel B. Ouderkirk

Corporal

Quickville, Kan.

Asbury Clark

Corporal

Nickerson, Kan.

Christopher C. Davis

Corporal

David City, Neb.

Milton A. Griffith

Corporal

Scandia, Kan.

James D. Housh

Corporal

Maquon, Ill.

Fernando C. Humphrey

Corporal

 

John F. Pattee

Corporal

Storm Lake, Iowa

Carey R. Walter

Corporal

David City, Neb.

Manuel Mowery

Corporal

Maquon, Ill.

William Liewallen

Corporal

Woodburn, Iowa

 

 

 

Arie, Samuel C.

Private

 

Atwood, Cournel B.

Private

Wichita, Kan.

Barbero, John

Private

 

Coon, Wm. S.

Private

Logan, Kan.

Coon, David

Private

 

Combs, Wilson H.

Private

Nemeha City, Neb.

Coon, Isaac

Private

Desota, Neb.

Caulkins, William

Private

Gilson, Ill.

Clark, Newton G.

Private

Cameron, Ill.

Conner, James H.

Private

Maquon, Ill.

Dunn, David M.

Private

 

Davis, Franklin

Private

Garden City, Kan.

Darnell, Sumner

Private

David City, Neb.

Darnell, Joel

Private

Garrison, Neb.

Fremold, Matthew

Private

Tecumseh, Neb.

Finch, Bruce

Private

Garrison, Neb.

Finch, Richard

Private

Turkville, Kan.

Foreman, Earnest

Private

Soldiers' Home, Quincy

Grove, Wm. A.

Private

Galva, Ill.

Grabill, Ira

Private

 

Gibbs, Harrison

Private

Stylesville, Iowa

Grissom, Morrison

Private

 

Gabriel, Warren

Private

Seward, Neb.

Hughs, John

Private

Gilson, Ill.

Housh, Jacob

Private

Maquon, Ill.

Hooper, Samuel H.

Private

Knoxville, Ill.

Jones, Wm. H.

Private

Canton, Ill.

Jones, John G.

Private

Tecumseh, Neb.

Kerns, John H.

Private

 

McFadden, Jacob R.

Private

 

McKown, Charles W.

Private

Gilson, Ill.

Moon, Robert A.

Private

David City, Neb.

Moon, John R.

Private

Garrison, Neb.

McGrew, John A. H.

Private

Bennett, Neb.

McVay, John H.

Private

Pleasanton, Iowa

Mick, Richard M.

Private

 

Norris, George

Private

Monmouth, Ill.

Ouderkirk, Martin

Private

 

Smith, Albert

Private

Maquon, Ill.

Smith, John M. W.

Private

Aurrora, Neb.

Smith, John A.

Private

Lenox, Iowa

Smith, Theodore C.

Private

Maquon, Ill.

Smithson, William M.

Private

David City, Neb.

Snyder, Alexander

Private

 

Stodgell, William A.

Private

 

Thurman, William T.

Private

 

Wells, Varnum G.

Private

 

West, John

Private

Knoxville, Ill.

Walter, Bowarter

Private

David City, Neb.

Wilson, John F.

Private

 

Way, Andrew J.

Private

Tecumseh, Neb.

Waddle, Josiah

Private

 

 

COMPANY G

Name

Rank

Post Office Address

 

 

 

Solomon L. Zinser

Capt.

Minonk, Ill.

Martin Kingman

1st  Lieut

Peoria, Ill.

Luther S. North

2nd  Lieut

 

Frederick S. Shearer

Sergeant

Streator, Ill.

Hiram H. Kellogg

Sergeant

 

Alexander Graham

Sergeant

Washington, Ill.

Milton H. Cloud

Sergeant

Paxton, Ill.

Charles G. Parker

Corporal

 

John T. Gibson

Corporal

Pontiac, Ill.

Wm. H. Wanghop

Corporal

Drakeville, Ia.

John H. Shaffer

Corporal

Deer Creek, Ill.

Henry F. Heiple

Corporal

Washington, Ill.

Simon Hawkins

Corporal

Sandusky, Ohio

James Roberts

Corporal

 

 

 

 

Breen, Edward

Private

 

Brown, Levi

Private

 

Bracken, D. G.

Private

Bloomington, Ill.

Botham, Geo. W.

Private

Washington, Ill.

Crosby, Ira

Private

 

Corbin, Madison

Private

 

Criswell, William

Private

 

Culp, Frank

Private

 

Cullom, David W.

Private

 

Davis, Dennis

Private

 

Eggman, Joshua

Private

 

Farrow, William

Private

 

Ferner, Geo. W.

Private

Washington, Ill.

Frock, Richard

Private

 

Hindbaugh, John W.

Private

 

Holland, Isaac W.

Private

Watseka, Ill.

Kindle, Enoch

Private

 

Keys, John T.

Private

 

Lee, Cambell

Private

Gridley, Ill.

Lane, Thomas B.

Private

Deer Creek, Ill.

Lamason, John

Private

Mackinaw, Ill.

Lewis, Robt.

Private

 

Layten, Henry C.

Private

Mackinaw, Ill.

Milligan, Calvin B.

Private

 

Mericle, Ralph

Private

 

Merchant, George

Private

 

Merrick, Isaac

Private

 

McCoy, David

Private

 

Magenheimer, Christian

Private

 

Oberdurf, Jacob

Private

 

Parker, William J.

Private

Stromsburg, Neb.

Parker, James H.

Private

 

Petty, Simeon

Private

Fremont, Ohio

Ruble, John

Private

Gridley, Ill.

Robinson, Nathaniel

Private

Lima, Ohio

Ruble, Jonah

Private

Washington, Ill.

Shoemaker, Rogers

Private

Washington, Ill.

Sutton, Phillip

Private

 

Smith, Harvey B.

Private

Morton, Ill.

Strawsbaugh, George

Private

Iowa

Scott, Henry E.

Private

 

Spier, John R.

Private

 

Tobias, Israel

Private

Sargeant, Neb.

Trowbridge, James

Private

Washington, Ill.

Upshaw, Thomas J.

Private

 

Walker, John

Private

 

Wood, Ebenezer

Private

 

Westerfield, Jacob

Private

Stanford, Ill.

Whistler, Benjamin

Private

Mackinaw, Ill.

Wilson, John O.

Private

 

Burns, Edward C.

Recruit

 

Cain, David L.

Recruit

 

Eggman, Augustus

Recruit

 

Eggman, John J.

Recruit

 

Feeley, William S.

Recruit

 

Graves, Samuel A.

Recruit

 

Hindbaugh, Philip

Recruit

 

Holler, Sam'l B.

Recruit

Sparland, Ill.

Riddle, Wm. H.

Recruit

 

Shurts, John W.

Recruit

 

Smith, Bethel

Recruit

 

Smith, Wm. M.

Recruit

 

Sanders, Charles

Recruit

 

Triplet, Wm. H.

Recruit

 

Wilson, Samuel L.

Recruit

 

Whistler, Benjamin F.

Recruit

Mackinaw, Ill.

 

COMPANY H

Name

Rank

Post Office Address

 

 

 

John H. Hall

Capt.

Peoria, Ill.

E. E. Peters

Lieut.

Peoria, Ill.

Wilber F. Hodge

Lieut.

 

John H. Henderson

Lieut.

 

Wm. C. Stewart

Sergeant

Peoria, Ill.

John Riley

Sergeant

 

Matthew Murdock

Sergeant

Humboldt, Kan.

W. T. Keener

Sergeant

Chicago, Ill.

Wm. Gosney

Sergeant

Nebraska

Sylvester McMahon

Sergeant

Nebraska

A. W. Belcher

Corporal

Brimfield, Ill.

McKendree McNeal

Corporal

Henry, Ill.

Alex. R. Hepperley

Corporal

Ellsworth, Kan.

Edward H. Kruger

Corporal

Atlanta, Ga.

Wm. A. Maginley

Corporal

 

Jonathan Haley

Corporal

 

J. D. Colton

Corporal

 

Andrew D. Church

Corporal

Fairmount, Neb.

 

 

 

Anthony, Jacob

Private

Pekin, Ill.

Buck, Wm.

Private

Peoria, Ill.

Buck, Miller

Private

Monica, Ill.

Breemer, John

Private

 

Blakewell, Thos.

Private

Princeville, Ill.

Beasmore, R. G.

Private

Missouri

Blundell, Wm.

Private

Peoria, Ill.

Brings, Wm.

Private

Medina, Ill.

Cole, O. W.

Private

Stromsburg, Neb.

Cain, D. L.

Private

Stromsburg, Neb.

Chancey, Wm. W.

Private

 

Charles, C. H.

Private

 

Daily, H.

Private

 

Edwards, E.

Private

 

Ewing, J. W. H.

Private

Peoria, Ill.

Flick, Erwin

Private

Peru, Ill.

Fullerton, J.

Private

 

Flagler, J. W.

Private

 

Fosket, L. W.

Private

 

Fox, C. A.

Private

 

Farnsworth, Geo.

Private

 

Hogue, H. G.

Private

 

Hart, J. W.

Private

 

Hoffman, J. A.

Private

Kansas

Kellogg, L. F.

Private

Iowa

Kellogg, W. P.

Private

 

Keach, Dan'l C.

Private

Southampton, Ill.

Kilver, H. J.

Private

Peoria, Ill.

Ley, W. L.

Private

Streator, Ill.

McFarland, J. A.

Private

Peoria, Ill.

McKone, John

Private

Nebraska

Moore, G. M.

Private

French Grove, Ill.

Martin, S.

Private

 

Newbon, W. W.

Private

 

Oburgh, F. V.

Private

 

Powell, W.

Private

Peoria, Co.

Place, E. O.

Private

 

Place, J. N.

Private

Peoria, Ill.

Rook, Chas.

Private

Brimfield, Ill.

Stone, Eli

Private

 

Smock, Wm.

Private

 

Schleigh, J. J.

Private

Peoria, Ill.

Slocum, Geo.

Private

 

Scott, Jas.

Private

Gilman, Ill.

Settle, Edward

Private

 

Thurston, Geo.

Private

 

Van Patten, E.

Private

Wyoming, Ill.

Wayne, Isaac L.

Private

 

Wayne, S.

Private

 

Wallace, Chas.

Private

 

Wilkins, John J.

Private

 

 

COMPANY I

Name

Rank

Post Office Address

 

 

 

Abner A. Lee

Capt.

Springfield, Kansas

Richard W. Groniger

1st  Lieut

Trivoli, Ill.

Jacob L. Fahnestock

2nd  Lieut

Peoria, Ill.

John Ernest

2nd  Lieut

Peoria, Ill.

Albert L. Bolinger

1st  Sergt

 

Thomas J. Love

Corporal

Peoria, Ill.

David Shreffler

Corporal

Peoria, Ill.

William R. Sharp

Corporal

Ft. Scott, Kan.

John Herstine

Corporal

Peoria, Ill.

Wm. P. Parker

Corporal

 

James A. Shreffler

Musician

Glasford, Ill.

John C. McQuown

Wagoner

Glasford, Ill.

 

 

 

Adams, John

Private

Peoria, Ill.

Bolinger, William D.

Private

 

Brown, Ezekiel A.

Private

Tecumseh, Neb.

Botts, Thomas W.

Private

Peoria, Ill.

Brown, John

Private

Oregon

Clark, William L.

Private

Vista, Neb.

Clark, John

Private

New Home

Erford, Benjamin

Private

Glasford, Ill.

Friess, Bernard

Private

Glasford, Ill.

Green, Absalom

Private

Henry, Ill.

Green, Josiah

Private

Peoria, Ill.

Gibson, William H.

Private

 

Hobble, Benjamin

Private

Glasford, Ill.

Henry, Jacob W.

Private

Diller, Neb.

Hartman, John W.

Private

Kansas

Hutchinson, Daniel S.

Private

Burchard, Neb.

Hinkle, W. A.

Private

Waxahatcha, Tex.

Jones, Francis M.

Private

Hollis, Ill.

Johnson, William H.

Private

 

Krisher, Lewis

Private

Smithville, Ill.

Kelly, Stephen P.

Private

 

Laycock, Alfred

Private

Kingston Mines, Ill.

Lindenberg, Ernest F. C.

Private

 

McBlair, Isaac

Private

Geneva, Neb.

Morphew, Enos

Private

Virginia, Neb.

McCormick, Lewis N.

Private

Glasford, Ill.

Pratts, Abram

Private

 

Petty, Jacob

Private

Glasford, Ill.

Reed, Jacob C.

Private

Trivoli, Ill.

Sprague, Stewart M.

Private

Glasford, Ill.

Shuman, Francis L.

Private

 

Sleister, Henry

Private

Peoria, Ill.

Shepherd, Daniel

Private

Glasford, Ill.

Strube, Ernst

Private

Iowa

Sprague, Lycurgus S.

Private

Glasford, Ill.

Simpson, William F.

Private

London Mills, Ill.

Sill, William P. J.

Private

Emporia, Kan.

Sill, Geo. D.

Private

 

Sill, Isaac M.

Private

 

Smith, David

Private

San Francisco, Cal.

Tichnor, Allen

Private

 

Tichnor, Albert J.

Private

 

Thorp, William W.

Private

 

Tindall, John W.

Private

Cramer, Ill.

Tindall, Allen C.

Private

Glasford, Ill.

Thomas, David

Private

 

Wolgamott, Jacob

Private

 

Wells, Hugh N.

Private

 

Weaver, James

Private

Peoria, Ill.

Yerrison, David

Private

 

Green, Abner S.

Recruit

Kingston Mines

Glassford, John

Recruit

Glasford

Glassford, George

Recruit

Glasford

Johnston, Cyrus

Recruit

Glasford

Kelly, Nelson

Recruit

Glasford

Petty, Ezekiel

Recruit

Canton, Ill.

Petty, John R.

Recruit

Eden, Ill.

COMPANY K

Name

Rank

Post Office Address

 

 

 

Levi A. Ross

Capt.

 

John Morrow

Lieut.

Chenoa, Ill.

James B. Peet

Lieut.

Prairie City, Ill.

John McGinnis

Lieut.

Peoria, Ill.

John Carter

Sergeant

Louisville, Mo.

John Z. Slane

Sergeant

Princeville, Ill.

John J. Anderson

Sergeant

Independence, Kan.

William H. Auten

Sergeant

Mabel, Mo.

Elijah Coburn

Sergeant

Princeville, Ill.

John M. Sabin

Corporal

Hoopston, Ill.

Simeon W. Rilea

Corporal

Chicago, Ill.

Patrick Byrnes

Corporal

Dunlap, Ill.

William H. Blanchard

Corporal

 

Jeremiah C. Ziler

Corporal

Spring Hill, Kan.

Henry Butler

Corporal

Princeville, Ill.

James E. White

Corporal

Monica, Ill.

Frederick Glatfelter

Corporal

Princeville, Ill.

 

 

 

Armstrong, E. M.

Private

Pawnee Rock, Kan.

Auten, George

Private

Hopkins, Mo.

Aten, C. S.

Private

Tecumseh, Mich.

Beach, Frank

Private

 

Burgess, Green

Private

Wellington, Kan.

Coburn, Samuel C.

Private

Princeville, Ill.

Cook, George

Private

 

Cowley, John J.

Private

Ft. Scott, Kan.

Debord, Jefferson

Private

Maitland, Mo.

Debord, Henry

Private

Nobnoster, Mo.

Francis, Joseph

Private

 

Glatfelter, Casper

Private

Havana, Kan.

Hare, Jefferson

Private

Nobnoster, Mo.

Hare, Marmaduke

Private

Greencastle, Mo.

Hare, Henry H.

Private

Elk City, Kan.

Hamilton, Geo. W.

Private

 

Keller, Emanuel

Private

Princeville, Ill.

Keller, William H.

Private

Highland, Kan.

Keller, Edmond

Private

Abilene, Kan.

Lair, Andrew J.

Private

Duncan, Ill.

Miller, James F.

Private

Liberty, Iowa

Morrow, Erastus

Private

Stark, Ill.

McGuire, Charles

Private

 

Nace, Joseph J.

Private

Rabb Station, Ind.

Nail, Geo. B.

Private

Flager, Iowa

Newman, Geo. W.

Private

Humpback, Kan.

Potts, Wm. W.

Private

Leon, Iowa

Parents, Joseph

Private

Princeville, Ill.

Potts, John T.

Private

Soldiers' Home, Leavenworth

Pembleton, Wm.

Private

Desmoines, Iowa

Pigg, Wm. P.

Private

 

Russell, James M.

Private

Fremont, Iowa

Roney, Hugh

Private

Monica, Ill.

Roney, Peter

Private

Quitman, Mo.

Rook, William

Private

 

Smith, John W.

Private

 

Smith, David

Private

Monica, Ill.

Smith, Archibald

Private

Monica, Ill.

Sayles, Thomas

Private

 

Springer, Noah

Private

West Dayton, Iowa

Sanger, Madison E.

Private

Kansas City

Scott, Andrew J.

Private

Duncan, Ill.

Timmons, Francis

Private

Duncan, Ill.

Wisenberg, Wm. H.

Private

Princeville

Wyley, Charles

Private

 

White, John E.

Private

Minden, Neb.

Young, Harrison

Private

 

Brock, Charles A.

Recruit

 

Glatfelter, Albert

Recruit

Quitman, Mo.

Hughes, William

Recruit

Sterling, Kan.

Harris, Joseph D.

Recruit

 

Lynch, James A.

Recruit

Goodland, Ind.

Nail, William

Recruit

 

 

DEATH ROLL

Name

Rank

Died

 

 

 

Charles Irons

Adjt.

 

Darwin E. Ward

Adjt.

 

Charles H. Deane

Quartermaster

Chicago, Ill

John M. Gregory

Surg.

 

Israel J. Guth

Surg.

Peoria

Joseph S. Millsops

Chaplain

California

 

COMPANY A

Name

Rank

Died

 

 

 

Robert Chettuch

 

 

Edwin M. Herrick

 

 

 

COMPANY B

Name

Rank

Died

 

 

 

Elias C. Breasley

Capt.

 

Peter Wykoff

Lieut.

Henry, Ill.

Hamilton P. Wandling

 

 

William Merrill

 

 

Jackson Dixon

 

 

Perry Green

 

 

James B. Matthews

 

 

Benjamin F. Smith

 

 

 

COMPANY C

Name

Rank

Died

 

 

 

William G. McDonald

Capt.

Chillicothe, Ill.

John H. Batchelder

Lieut.

Peoria, Ill.

Atkins, James H.

 

Dillon, Ill.

Carver, Horace D.

 

Marshall Co., Ill.

Donovan, Michael

 

Lawrence, Kansas

Easton, William D.

 

Southampton, Ill.

Selders, John B.

 

Chillicothe, Ill.

Thomas, John

 

Little Rock, Ark.

James Robinson

 

Quitman, Mo.

 

COMPANY D

Name

Rank

Died

 

 

 

Robert M. Jones

Sergeant

 

Isaac H. Moore

Corporal

 

James W. Bohanan

 

 

John W. Delleplane

 

 

Henry Frank

 

 

Wm. F. Fry

 

 

Henry Hartman

 

 

Jacob B. Thatcher

 

 

Robert Taggart

 

 

Leroy S. McCoy

 

 

John B. Preston

 

 

Jacob B. Shotcher

 

 

William M. Young

 

 

 

COMPANY E

Name

Rank

Died

 

 

 

Malchia Grove

Lieut.

Laprairie, Ill.

Sol Williams

Lieut.

Junction City, Kan.

George Kear

 

Sparlan, Ill.

William Stewert

 

Princeville, Ill.

William Dawson

 

Lawn Ridge, Ill.

Willard Powers

 

Anna, Ill.

Samuel F. Sides

 

Bowling Green, Ky.

 

COMPANY F

Name

Rank

Died

 

 

 

Augustus Dickson

 

 

Adrian Humphries

 

 

Adam Housh

 

 

Alfred Reader

 

 

Franklin McVay

 

 

Thomas Housh

 

 

 

COMPANY G

Name

Rank

Died

 

 

 

Oliver P. Eaton

 

 

John Graves

 

 

Robert H. Shepherd

 

Drowned

Shepherd M. Gandy

 

 

Sebastian Minch

 

 

 

COMPANY H

Name

Rank

Died

 

 

 

John T. Geerling

 

Peoria, Ill.

Robert Foster

 

 

William Bennett

 

 

Sebalt Heckan

 

 

Jacob Jayne

 

 

John Jenkinson

 

 

Richard Mason

 

 

A. W. Peters

 

 

F. S. Eaton

 

Cincinnati

E. W. Fuller

 

Brimfield

 

COMPANY I

Name

Rank

Died

 

 

 

Chambers, Robert S.

 

 

Hand, Harvey

 

 

Lamasters, Isaac L.

 

 

Wolgamott, Jonathan

 

murdered by E. Noble & Son

Cromwell, John

 

 

Saylor, William C.

 

 

Wolf, Jonathan B.

 

 

Josiah Green

 

Peoria

 

COMPANY K

Name

Rank

Died

 

 

 

H. Irwin

Lieut.

Princeville, Ill.

Bohrer, Samuel

Corporal

Oak Hill, Ill.

Beckner, Andrew J.

Private

Delavan, Ill.

Debord, John

Private

Missouri

Dukes, John

Private

Missouri

Seitts, Benjamin

Private

Michigan

Russell, James A.

Private

Princeville, Ill.

Snyder, Peter

Sergeant

Kewanee, Ill.

White, William R.

Private

Hoopston, Ill.

    


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